Posted in Lifestyle

The Fast 800

I’ve changed my diet in an effort to improve my health, and I’m really enjoying it!

A few years ago, having suffered with IBS related problems and had little-to-no answers from the gastroenterologist I went to see, I picked up a book called The Clever Guts Diet. Written by Dr Micheal Mosley, a doctor and science journalist, The Clever Guts Diet teaches about the importance of healthy bacteria in the gut; the major role our gut plays in our general health; and the kinds of foods that will help to enhance the good bacteria and keep away the bad. It’s about three quarters information backed by science, referencing real peer-reviewed studies, and one quarter meal planning/diet advice for anyone who wants to ‘reset’ their gut health. I never ended up following the reset programme but I did pick up a few tips that I tried to integrate into my life and diet. (Including the wonders of Turmeric which I later wrote my first uni essay about!)

Mosley is most well-known for his groundbreaking book ‘The 5:2 Fast Diet’. The basic principle of which is that eating 500 calories on two days of the week, and eating ‘normally’ but healthily for the other five is a great way to lose weight and improve your health.

Fast forward 6 years to last December and Mosley released another book, accounting for more up-to-date science and bringing together his previous works into a new programme called The Fast 800. It consists of 3 phases and you can start with any of them depending on your goals. Phase 1 is The Very Fast 800 – a rapid weight loss phase where you stick to around 800 calories a day for anywhere between 2 and 12 weeks (again, depending on your goals). This can help not only with weight loss but with losing visceral fat and reversing the insulin resistance I talked about in my last post. (Mosley’s book The 8-week Blood Sugar Diet documents how he reversed his Type 2 Diabetes through diet and without medication. As a Pharmacy student I will definitely be touching on that again, but that’s a topic for a different blog post!) Phase 2 is ‘The New 5:2’, which is the same principle as it has always been, but recommends 800 calories on your two fast days. This is still low enough to make a difference but high enough to keep you feeling fuller for longer and experiencing fewer hunger pangs/cravings. The third phase is simply a Mediterranean-style diet, including fresh vegetables, lean meat and fewer refined carbs (which are broken down to sugar in your blood stream very quickly). Mosley says you skip straight to phase 2 if you don’t have much weight to lose or even straight to 3 if you simply want to live healthier.

Why am I regurgitating all of this? Because, after doing a lot of research, I decided it was worth trying for me. I bought myself a copy of The Fast 800 Recipe Book and have been attempting the first Very Fast 800 stage for about a week and a half. I haven’t stuck religiously to it – I enjoyed a celebratory cheesecake slice when Toby passed his driving test, and shared Nando’s with a friend when she was having a rough day.

I’m referring to it as a programme rather than a diet because if I use the word diet, I get a look that says “You’re too young/skinny to be dieting”. Really, the word ‘diet’ just refers to what you eat, not necessarily to losing weight or eating a particular way. I’m changing my diet to include and exclude different things that I haven’t done before.

I’ve lost around 5lbs and I’m really enjoying the recipes – both making and eating them! At the moment my routine is looking like this:

Breakfast: a nutritious smoothie containing fruit, full fat yoghurt, oats and other ingredients – around 200 cals. Usually an apple to go with it.

Lunch: I’ve been meal-prepping; making a meal big enough to serve 4 on my days off and splitting it into 4 lunch boxes for the coming work days. I like pairing whatever protein-rich main I’ve made with some green veg such as broccoli and green beans. (You’re allowed to add those in abundance without including them in calorie counts! Yay!)

Dinner: A lighter meal, as I’m not always hungry by this point and don’t want to spend a lot of time cooking and end up eating too late, as this is famously bad for your sleep cycle and digestion. One of the breakfast recipes has become a dinner favourite of mine; poached eggs with spinach and mushrooms. I literally cannot poach eggs, so I fry them in olive oil instead. It’s designed as a breakfast but I love it as a light evening meal.

I’m not endorsing this particular programme, nor am I actively encouraging anyone else to try it. I’m simply sharing my experience because I’m finding it both rewarding and fascinating. I do urge anyone who fancies changing their lifestyle for health reasons to do a lot of research (using real scientific studies and not just reading articles from Cosmo Magazine) and consult a GP, Pharmacist or Nutritionist if you need professional advice. In a week or so I’ll provide a further update on my thoughts.

*This post is not endorsed or sponsored by The Fast 800 or by Dr Michael Mosley*

Posted in Lifestyle

Reality Check

I wrote this on the 31st July and have thought about whether or not to post it. I’ve decided I shall. I’ve left the post as it is so when it says ‘today’, it refers to the day I wrote it…

“This morning I did an at-home blood glucose test and realised it’s time to make a change. (Trigger warning: depression, weight loss/body image)

During my first year at uni – in fact particularly during the second half of that year – I found myself feeling particularly depressed. I take Citalopram for depression anyway but with medication and my own coping mechanisms I manage usually to remain on an even keel. However, from about February, up until the end of the academic year, I stopped doing things I enjoyed, like exercising and reading; my motivation was at rock bottom and I was missing about 50% of my lectures. I spent most of my time laying in bed, watching Netflix and eating cookies, or just sleeping the day away. I couldn’t be bothered to cook most evenings so I bought reduced microwave meals from the M&S garage down the road.

‘But you ran a 10k!’ – yes, I did, which I signed up for at the end of March, thinking that a big goal like that would help me get back on track. To be perfectly honest, it didn’t. I did the 10k and I loved it and was so proud of myself, but before I arrived in London that day, I was totally unprepared! The only thing more powerful than the voice in my head telling me to give up and call it off was the voice telling me what a loser I’d look, having hyped it up and written about it, only to chicken out. Fake it ’til you make it actually worked on this occasion I guess.

Since I’ve been home, I’ve been in a much better place. I’m working full time again and while that’s tiring, I really do love my job and it gets me out of the house five days a week which can only be a good thing. Having found out on the 11th July that I did actually pass my first year at uni, I’m feeling much more confident about going back. (Yes, dropping out did cross my mind back in June). But the effects of those sedentary few months and the comfort eating that came with it have stuck around.

Those who have known me for a few years will know that I’ve always been slim. Since the beginning of this year, I estimate to have gained about 2 stone. (Estimate because I don’t weigh myself very often and don’t know exactly how much I weighed a year ago, but I can make a good guess.)

Now please, please don’t misunderstand me. There is nothing wrong with gaining weight or being the weight or size or figure that I am right now. I don’t look at myself in the mirror and hate what I see. Nor should I! My personal issue is that after being a certain way for the first 21 years of my life, and then for that to change in the space of 6 months without me really noticing until now is weird for me. My body now is not what I’m used to. And I’d like to go back to what I’m used to. Basically, I don’t feel like me. I hope that makes sense.

From a health point of view, most of the weight I’ve gained appears to be visceral fat – the kind that manifests around the abdominal cavity and therefore surrounds important internal organs such as the liver and pancreas. This type of fat is also linked to insulin resistance, which can be a precursor to Type 2 Diabetes. This is where that blood test comes in. I’d been doing some idle reading and research on this area and knew that it was possible to buy an at-home one-time blood glucose testing kit (which is NOT a diagnostic tool!) and figured I’d have a go. My blood glucose level is sitting somewhere around 110 mg/dl (milligrams per deciletre). Normal levels are considered to be below 100mg/dl and 100-125mg/dl is considered pre-diabetic. While this is all super interesting and possibly a bit concerning, I am obviously not a doctor (or a pharmacist, yet!) and I’m definitely not in the business of self diagnosing. The instructions in the kit suggest that if your blood-glucose is above or below the normal range, that you repeat the test in 10 days time and if the result remains the same then you visit your GP for proper diagnostic testing.

I’ve been telling myself for a few weeks that I should change my diet but because my weight wasn’t bothering me that much, I’ve put it off and procrastinated. Until this morning, when I realised I could really be putting my health at risk by not taking action against my poor diet.

I’m writing this so publicly, partly because writing at all helps me to process and – as with the Vitality 10k earlier this year – I’d like to hold myself accountable, which I struggle with unless I feel like I’m accountable to someone else.

This blog, when I created it, was all about sharing my journey with people I love and people who don’t know me at all. This part of my journey is about self-care, self-love and the desire to be the healthiest version of myself.

In a future post I will write about some of the specific goals I have set myself and the way I’m going to achieve them. Plus, look out for an unrelated but exciting announcement coming soon..!

Much love xx

(Disclaimer: Most of my research has been from Dr Michael Mosley’s literature and from Diabetes UK. Please don’t take my word as fact and if you’re worried about your own health, go and see a pharmacist or your GP.)”

Posted in Vitality London 10,000

Happy Global Running Day!

I just found out that today is Global Running Day! An appropriate day to have completed my first run since last week; 3.52km in 30 minutes.

It’s been just over a week since I went to London and ran in the Vitality London 10,000. I already wrote about how proud I am of myself, but to celebrate Global Running Day today, I want to tell you about some observations I made about myself while I was doing it.

The major one was that rather than becoming tired, having expended my energy, I actually found that the experience, in particular the actual running, got easier as I went along. My total time was 1h22m19s but the timing devices on our shoes also recorded the time at which we crossed the 5km halfway point and it turned out that I completed the second 5km 8 minutes faster than the first 5km!

One factor of this I think is the breaking down of the mental barriers that had got me so nervous. In training I’d be getting tired and sore around 2 or 3 km and I’d think ‘I can’t do it’ and stop. On the day of the 10k though, giving up and going home wasn’t an option. I had to push through whatever I was feeling and just get on with it. Doing that, and finishing the race gave me the proof that actually – I can do it!

Another observation which was slightly less positive was that my ankles were BURNING. That’s part of what I had to push through and fortunately that got more bearable and less severe as I went along. I ran from the start line and the first time I felt like I had to slow down and walk was because my ankles were hurting. But as soon as I slowed down, they hurt even more! That was a pretty unpleasant conundrum. I’ve been to see a sports physio who suggested that the burning pain may be some irritation/inflammation of the tendons around my ankle joints. I need to take it easy until I’ve had that investigated a little further I think, because I was told that that type of irritation can increase the chances of stress fractures. But I’m not going to stop running and I’m going to aim to run 5k regularly now as part of a general exercise routine.

This newfound ability to run makes me feel like a kid with a new toy!

Posted in Vitality London 10,000

I Did It!

10 weeks ago I decided to take on the challenge of running 10 kilometres in the Vitality London 10,000.

In that time I’ve been through a range of thought processes from ‘Hell yeah I can run 10k’ to ‘Running is actually quite hard’ to ‘It’s okay, I’ve still got time to pull it back’ to ‘Crap, it’s in 2 weeks and I’ve barely run more than 3km’.

I stopped writing so much about it as the event got closer ’cause I became really scared that I wouldn’t be able to do it and I knew I hadn’t trained as much as I thought I would. This was down to a range of reasons including bad mental health days, family members in hospital and stressing about uni exams.

At the beginning of the process I felt really confident and was running in the gym every couple of days. Then I took my training outside and realised that running on the road is way more impactful on my ankles than running on a treadmill. Before Monday, I hadn’t run more than about 3km in one go.

And yet, I completed my first 10k in 1 hour, 22 minutes and 19 seconds! When I crossed the finish line I was so bloody chuffed with myself and two days later I actually still can’t quite believe I did a 10k!

I need to shout out my amazing boyfriend, Toby, for coming with me and waiting for me at the 8.5km mark to spur me on for that last stretch! I ran with my phone in my hand so that I could listen to music and he kept sending me encouraging messages along the lines of ‘Keep going! You can do it!’.

I intend to keep training and keep running, so it probably won’t be too long before I’m doing another 10k! I’ll let you know!

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Posted in May, Myself and I (2019)

May 12th – Storms

I do not like rain.

This is something that my boyfriend and I disagree on. If we’re out in the rain, I’ll inevitably whinge about it, and he’ll inevitably question why I hate it so much.

He loves rain. But there is one element of it that we can agree on and that is that the sound of it on the roof or the windows, when you’re snuggled up in your pyjamas with nothing to do and no where to go, can be calming and soothing. It makes me feel cosy too, knowing that it’s gross outside but I’m all warm and comfy inside.

I know a lot of people who are scared of thunderstorms. But I’ve always loved them and been fascinated by them (again, from within the comfort of my house with four walls!). In my old home, my bedroom had a window seat, and if there was a thunderstorm, it wouldn’t matter what time of the night it was, I would get out of bed and sit on the window seat to watch the lightning strikes and listen to the rain and thunder. I just think there’s something so beautiful about it.

Last year, when I was in Australia, I was near a town called Broome, on the North West Coast and I was there during wet season. The night I was there, the most fantastic electrical storm was occurring and I couldn’t take my eyes off it. It actually started as I was driving into the town and I sat in the car for ages, just in awe. For once, I didn’t try to take pictures that would inevitably turn out like crap, I just sat there and enjoyed the moment because I think it was the most incredible thunderstorm I’ve ever seen.

This has been a little bit of a rambling post but my point is, I don’t like being in the rain, but I do like watching thunderstorms. Fin.

Posted in May, Myself and I (2019)

New Plan!

Since the 3rd day of ‘May, Myself and I’, life has thrown a whole bunch of crap my way. And here we are a week later and I haven’t managed to write a single other blog post! *sigh*

I haven’t even actually had time to watch Carrie Hope Fletcher’s M,M&I videos on YouTube. I’m not giving up completely cause I do like the prompts and it’s interesting and challenging to write about something that hasn’t come from within my own head. To let someone else go ‘what’s your take on this?’ rather than going ‘what do I feel like talking about today?’.

I don’t quite know how I’m going to proceed though. I’m thinking maybe I’ll aim for 4 blog posts a week and pick and choose the prompts I want to do. That makes it a bit more manageable than 7 a week while also trying to juggle revision, running, work, family stuff and my own mental health.

Tomorrow’s prompt is Storms and I’m going to give that one a go as soon as I’ve published this. Wish me luck!

Posted in May, Myself and I (2019)

May 3rd – Donut

This is going to be a Brighton appreciation post.

As most people who know me personally will know, I moved to Brighton (UK) in September 2018 to start my degree in Pharmacy at the University of Brighton. As soon as I discovered that Brighton Uni offered the course I wanted to study (MPharm with Integrated Foundation Year), I knew it would be my first choice uni.

My Mum was born in Brighton and although she later lived in Essex before flying the nest, both my Grandparents ended up moving back here which means I’ve been to Brighton a few times a year ever since I was a child. I’ve heard people say that it’s like London but friendlier. I can’t get on board with that description because I don’t see any resemblance to London in it at all. That may be because Brighton holds a lot of unique childhood memories for me though. One of which is going down to the pier and getting fresh, hot donuts (there’s that prompt!) with my Mum and whoever else we happened to be with on the day. Wandering through The Lanes and along the seafront are classic Brighton things for anyone but for me there was my Mum’s favourite restaurant, Terre A Terre, family dinners in the fish and chip restaurant at the Marina (which unfortunately no longer exists) and getting to push my Nan’s wheelchair when I was a bit older which I loved because it made me feel helpful and grown up.

The house I’ve ended up living in this year happens to be across the road from the cemetery where my Nan and my Great Aunty’s souls are resting. I’ve been thinking about my Nanny a lot recently; she passed away in 2010 and although I was relatively young at the time, I still have vivid memories of some of the time she spent in the Hospice. She would have been 80 this July. She was a wonderful, selfless woman who had been dealt a pretty tough hand in life but who never in my lifetime complained or felt sorry for herself. I think her grandchildren were the light of her life. She’s been gone for almost half of my life but I still love being in Brighton and feeling close to her, knowing she’d be so proud of what I’m doing and so happy to have me nearby if she was still alive.

This post is intended to be thoughtful rather than maudlin. I know it seems a little sad but as soon as the prompt word ‘donut’ came up, it made me think of hot donuts on Brighton Pier and all the memories associated with that.

Oddly enough, I don’t find myself on the pier all that often (something I need to rectify!), but when I do, I always make sure to get a hot donut for old time’s sake. It’s important to live in the present and to look forward to the future, but sometimes remembering the past, in the people in it, can be a joyful and uplifting experience.

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Me and my Mummy on Brighton’s Palace Pier, 12th March 2017